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Five key steps for creating, implementing an active shooter plan at your healthcare facility

Medical Environment Update, August 1, 2018

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 The threat of an active shooter roaming the hallways is one of the biggest worries among safety professionals and C-suite executives in the healthcare industry.

 
Preparedness for active shooter situations is also on the minds of accrediting organizations and agencies such as the NFPA, which in May unveiled a new standard, NFPA 3000, to help first responders, healthcare providers, facility managers, and others prepare for an active shooter incident. CMS, The Joint Commission, and OSHA have also called for better protection of healthcare workers from workplace violence of all kinds, including active shooters, or are currently considering new standards.
 
Steve Wilder, BA, CHSP, STS, has spent more than three decades in healthcare safety, security, and risk management, including stints as a hospital risk manager and corporate director of safety and security for a health system. He has consulted with hundreds of clients, including hospitals, clinics, and physician practices, and has trained thousands of workers in workplace safety and security. 
 
In addition to his regular contributions to healthcare magazines, Wilder co-authored the book The Essentials of Aggression Management in Healthcare: From Talkdown to Takedown.
 
During a December 2017 webinar organized by HCPro, Wilder explained how to comply with the revised CMS rule for emergency preparedness and prepare your staff for any situation. He also helped attendees understand the key parts of an active shooter plan, went over how staff can improve decision-making skills, and provided tips on controlling staff anxiety and stress during emergency situations.
 
During this 90-minute webinar—which can be viewed on demand through HCMarketplace.com—he shared his five key components for an active shooter plan. The following is a summary of that portion of Wilder’s presentation.

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Medical Environment Update.